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Star wars restricted files chapter 22 bankruptcy

star wars restricted files chapter 22 bankruptcy

The storied Manhattan clothier Brooks Brothers is filing for bankruptcy protection. The company that says it's put 40 U.S. presidents in its suits survived two world wars and navigated through casual Fridays and a loosening of dress standards even on Wall Street, but the coronavirus pandemic pushed the year-old company into seek Chapter Your Central Hub for the Latest News and Photos powered by karacto.xyz Images. Airline Videos, Route Maps and Aircraft Slide Shows. Framable Prints and Posters. Boise City has restricted businesses with a "sexual content" to operating only in certain areas within the city limits. Such a restriction is a(n): Bob Smith wants to file for bankruptcy protection. He has a regular income. Which chapter of the Bankruptcy Code applies to his bankruptcy proceeding? Chapter . star wars restricted files chapter 22 bankruptcy

Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new. All costume off a man is pitiful or grotesque. It is only the serious eye peering from and the sincere life passed within it, which restrain laughter and consecrate the costume of any people.

Let Harlequin be taken with a fit of the colic and his trappings will have to serve that mood too. When the soldier is hit by a cannon ball rags are as becoming as purple. The childish and savage taste of men and women for new patterns keeps how many shaking and squinting through kaleidoscopes that they may discover the particular figure which this generation requires today.

The manufacturers have learned that this taste is merely whimsical. Of two patterns which differ only by a few threads more or less of a particular color, the one will be sold readily, the other lie on the shelf, though it frequently happens that after the lapse of a season the latter becomes the most fashionable.

Comparatively, tattooing is not the hideous custom which it is called. It is not barbarous merely because the printing is skin-deep and unalterable. I cannot believe that our factory system is the best mode by which men may get clothing.

The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched. In the long run men hit only what they aim at. Therefore, though they should fail immediately, they had better aim at something high. As for a Shelter, I will not deny that this is now a necessary of life, though there are instances of men having done without it for long periods in colder countries than this.

In our climate, in the summer, it was formerly almost solely a covering at night. Man was not made so large limbed and robust but that he must seek to narrow his world, and wall in a space such as fitted him. He was at first bare and out of doors; but though this was pleasant enough in serene and warm weather, by daylight, the rainy season and the winter, to say nothing of the torrid sun, would perhaps have nipped his race in the bud if he had not made haste to clothe himself with the shelter of a house.

Adam and Eve, according to the fable, wore the bower before other clothes. Man wanted a home, a place of warmth, or comfort, first of physical warmth, then the warmth of the affections. We may imagine a time when, in the infancy of the human race, some enterprising mortal crept into a hollow in a rock for shelter.

Every child begins the world again, to some extent, and loves to stay out doors, even in wet and cold. It plays house, as well as horse, having an instinct for it. Who does not remember the interest with which when young he looked at shelving rocks, or any approach to a cave?

It was the natural yearning of that portion of our most primitive ancestor which still survived in us. From the cave we have advanced to roofs of palm leaves, of bark and boughs, of linen woven and stretched, of grass and straw, of boards and shingles, of stones and tiles.

At last, we know not what it is to live in the open air, and our lives are domestic in more senses than we think. From the hearth to the field is a great distance. It would be well perhaps if we were to spend more of our days and nights without any obstruction between us and the celestial bodies, if the poet did not speak so much from under a roof, or the saint dwell there so long.

Birds do not sing in caves, nor do doves cherish their innocence in dovecots. However, if one designs to construct a dwelling house, it behooves him to exercise a little Yankee shrewdness, lest after all he find himself in a workhouse, a labyrinth without a clue, a museum, an almshouse, a prison, or a splendid mausoleum instead. Consider first how slight a shelter is absolutely necessary. I have seen Penobscot Indians, in this town, living in tents of thin cotton cloth, while the snow was nearly a foot deep around them, and I thought that they would be glad to have it deeper to keep out the wind.

Formerly, when how to get my living honestly, with freedom left for my proper pursuits, was a question which vexed me even more than it does now, for unfortunately I am become somewhat callous, I used to see a large box by the railroad, six feet long by three wide, in which the laborers locked up their tools at night, and it suggested to me that every man who was hard pushed might get such a one for a dollar, and, having bored a few auger holes in it, to admit the air at least, get into it when it rained and at night, and hook down the lid, and so have freedom in his love, and in his soul be free.

This did not appear the worst, nor by any means a despicable alternative. You could sit up as late as you pleased, and, whenever you got up, go abroad without any landlord or house-lord dogging you for rent. Many a man is harassed to death to pay the rent of a larger and more luxurious box who would not have frozen to death in such a box as this.

I am far from jesting. Economy is a subject which admits of being treated with levity, but it cannot so be disposed of. A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.

The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former Some I have seen, sixty or a hundred feet long and thirty feet broad I have often lodged in their wigwams, and found them as warm as the best English houses. The Indians had advanced so far as to regulate the effect of the wind by a mat suspended over the hole in the roof and moved by a string.

Such a lodge was in the first instance constructed in a day or two at most, and taken down and put up in a few hours; and every family owned one, or its apartment in one. In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.

In the large towns and cities, where civilization especially prevails, the number of those who own a shelter is a very small fraction of the whole. The rest pay an annual tax for this outside garment of all, become indispensable summer and winter, which would buy a village of Indian wigwams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live. I do not mean to insist here on the disadvantage of hiring compared with owning, but it is evident that the savage owns his shelter because it costs so little, while the civilized man hires his commonly because he cannot afford to own it; nor can he, in the long run, any better afford to hire.

An annual rent of from twenty-five to a hundred dollars, these are the country rates, entitles him to the benefit of the improvements of centuries, spacious apartments, clean paint and paper, Rumford fireplace, back plastering, Venetian blinds, copper pump, spring lock, a commodious cellar, and many other things. But how happens it that he who is said to enjoy these things is so commonly a poor civilized man, while the savage, who has them not, is rich as a savage?

If it is asserted that civilization is a real advance in the condition of man,—and I think that it is, though only the wise improve their advantages,—it must be shown that it has produced better dwellings without making them more costly; and the cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run. If we suppose him to pay a rent instead, this is but a doubtful choice of evils.

Would the savage have been wise to exchange his wigwam for a palace on these terms? It may be guessed that I reduce almost the whole advantage of holding this superfluous property as a fund in store against the future, so far as the individual is concerned, mainly to the defraying of funeral expenses. But perhaps a man is not required to bury himself.

Nevertheless this points to an important distinction between the civilized man and the savage; and, no doubt, they have designs on us for our benefit, in making the life of a civilized people an institution , in which the life of the individual is to a great extent absorbed, in order to preserve and perfect that of the race. But I wish to show at what a sacrifice this advantage is at present obtained, and to suggest that we may possibly so live as to secure all the advantage without suffering any of the disadvantage.

When I consider my neighbors, the farmers of Concord, who are at least as well off as the other classes, I find that for the most part they have been toiling twenty, thirty, or forty years, that they may become the real owners of their farms, which commonly they have inherited with encumbrances, or else bought with hired money,—and we may regard one third of that toil as the cost of their houses,—but commonly they have not paid for them yet.

It is true, the encumbrances sometimes outweigh the value of the farm, so that the farm itself becomes one great encumbrance, and still a man is found to inherit it, being well acquainted with it, as he says. On applying to the assessors, I am surprised to learn that they cannot at once name a dozen in the town who own their farms free and clear. If you would know the history of these homesteads, inquire at the bank where they are mortgaged.

The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him. I doubt if there are three such men in Concord. What has been said of the merchants, that a very large majority, even ninety-seven in a hundred, are sure to fail, is equally true of the farmers.

With regard to the merchants, however, one of them says pertinently that a great part of their failures are not genuine pecuniary failures, but merely failures to fulfil their engagements, because it is inconvenient; that is, it is the moral character that breaks down. But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.

Bankruptcy and repudiation are the springboards from which much of our civilization vaults and turns its somersets, but the savage stands on the unelastic plank of famine.

The farmer is endeavoring to solve the problem of a livelihood by a formula more complicated than the problem itself.

To get his shoestrings he speculates in herds of cattle. With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it. This is the reason he is poor; and for a similar reason we are all poor in respect to a thousand savage comforts, though surrounded by luxuries.

As Chapman sings,—. And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.

I know one or two families, at least, in this town, who, for nearly a generation, have been wishing to sell their houses in the outskirts and move into the village, but have not been able to accomplish it, and only death will set them free.

Granted that the majority are able at last either to own or hire the modern house with all its improvements. While civilization has been improving our houses, it has not equally improved the men who are to inhabit them. It has created palaces, but it was not so easy to create noblemen and kings. But how do the poor minority fare? Perhaps it will be found, that just in proportion as some have been placed in outward circumstances above the savage, others have been degraded below him.

The luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another. The mason who finishes the cornice of the palace returns at night perchance to a hut not so good as a wigwam.

It is a mistake to suppose that, in a country where the usual evidences of civilization exist, the condition of a very large body of the inhabitants may not be as degraded as that of savages. I refer to the degraded poor, not now to the degraded rich. To know this I should not need to look farther than to the shanties which every where border our railroads, that last improvement in civilization; where I see in my daily walks human beings living in sties, and all winter with an open door, for the sake of light, without any visible, often imaginable, wood pile, and the forms of both old and young are permanently contracted by the long habit of shrinking from cold and misery, and the development of all their limbs and faculties is checked.

It certainly is fair to look at that class by whose labor the works which distinguish this generation are accomplished. Such too, to a greater or less extent, is the condition of the operatives of every denomination in England, which is the great workhouse of the world. Or I could refer you to Ireland, which is marked as one of the white or enlightened spots on the map.

Contrast the physical condition of the Irish with that of the North American Indian, or the South Sea Islander, or any other savage race before it was degraded by contact with the civilized man.

Their condition only proves what squalidness may consist with civilization. I hardly need refer now to the laborers in our Southern States who produce the staple exports of this country, and are themselves a staple production of the South. But to confine myself to those who are said to be in moderate circumstances. Most men appear never to have considered what a house is, and are actually though needlessly poor all their lives because they think that they must have such a one as their neighbors have.

As if one were to wear any sort of coat which the tailor might cut out for him, or, gradually leaving off palmleaf hat or cap of woodchuck skin, complain of hard times because he could not afford to buy him a crown! It is possible to invent a house still more convenient and luxurious than we have, which yet all would admit that man could not afford to pay for. Shall we always study to obtain more of these things, and not sometimes to be content with less?

When I think of the benefactors of the race, whom we have apotheosized as messengers from heaven, bearers of divine gifts to man, I do not see in my mind any retinue at their heels, any car-load of fashionable furniture. Or what if I were to allow—would it not be a singular allowance? Morning work! I had three pieces of limestone on my desk, but I was terrified to find that they required to be dusted daily, when the furniture of my mind was all undusted still, and I threw them out the window in disgust.

How, then, could I have a furnished house? I would rather sit in the open air, for no dust gathers on the grass, unless where man has broken ground.

It is the luxurious and dissipated who set the fashions which the herd so diligently follow. The traveller who stops at the best houses, so called, soon discovers this, for the publicans presume him to be a Sardanapalus, and if he resigned himself to their tender mercies he would soon be completely emasculated. I think that in the railroad car we are inclined to spend more on luxury than on safety and convenience, and it threatens without attaining these to become no better than a modern drawing room, with its divans, and ottomans, and sun-shades, and a hundred other oriental things, which we are taking west with us, invented for the ladies of the harem and the effeminate natives of the Celestial Empire, which Jonathan should be ashamed to know the names of.

I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself than be crowded on a velvet cushion. I would rather ride on earth in an ox cart with a free circulation, than go to heaven in the fancy car of an excursion train and breathe a malaria all the way.

When he was refreshed with food and sleep he contemplated his journey again. He dwelt, as it were, in a tent in this world, and was either threading the valleys, or crossing the plains, or climbing the mountain tops. But lo! The man who independently plucked the fruits when he was hungry is become a farmer; and he who stood under a tree for shelter, a housekeeper. We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven. We have adopted Christianity merely as an improved method of agri -culture.

We have built for this world a family mansion, and for the next a family tomb. There is actually no place in this village for a work of fine art, if any had come down to us, to stand, for our lives, our houses and streets, furnish no proper pedestal for it. There is not a nail to hang a picture on, nor a shelf to receive the bust of a hero or a saint. When I consider how our houses are built and paid for, or not paid for, and their internal economy managed and sustained, I wonder that the floor does not give way under the visitor while he is admiring the gewgaws upon the mantel-piece, and let him through into the cellar, to some solid and honest though earthy foundation.

I cannot but perceive that this so called rich and refined life is a thing jumped at, and I do not get on in the enjoyment of the fine arts which adorn it, my attention being wholly occupied with the jump; for I remember that the greatest genuine leap, due to human muscles alone, on record, is that of certain wandering Arabs, who are said to have cleared twenty-five feet on level ground.

Without factitious support, man is sure to come to earth again beyond that distance. The first question which I am tempted to put to the proprietor of such great impropriety is, Who bolsters you? Are you one of the ninety-seven who fail, or of the three who succeed? Answer me these questions, and then perhaps I may look at your bawbles and find them ornamental. The cart before the horse is neither beautiful nor useful. Before we can adorn our houses with beautiful objects the walls must be stripped, and our lives must be stripped, and beautiful housekeeping and beautiful living be laid for a foundation: now, a taste for the beautiful is most cultivated out of doors, where there is no house and no housekeeper.

The wealthy and principal men in New England, in the beginning of the colonies, commenced their first dwelling houses in this fashion for two reasons; firstly, in order not to waste time in building, and not to want food the next season; secondly, in order not to discourage poor laboring people whom they brought over in numbers from Fatherland. In the course of three or four years, when the country became adapted to agriculture, they built themselves handsome houses, spending on them several thousands.

In this course which our ancestors took there was a show of prudence at least, as if their principle were to satisfy the more pressing wants first.

But are the more pressing wants satisfied now? When I think of acquiring for myself one of our luxurious dwellings, I am deterred, for, so to speak, the country is not yet adapted to human culture, and we are still forced to cut our spiritual bread far thinner than our forefathers did their wheaten.

Not that all architectural ornament is to be neglected even in the rudest periods; but let our houses first be lined with beauty, where they come in contact with our lives, like the tenement of the shellfish, and not overlaid with it.

But, alas! I have been inside one or two of them, and know what they are lined with. Though we are not so degenerate but that we might possibly live in a cave or a wigwam or wear skins today, it certainly is better to accept the advantages, though so dearly bought, which the invention and industry of mankind offer. In such a neighborhood as this, boards and shingles, lime and bricks, are cheaper and more easily obtained than suitable caves, or whole logs, or bark in sufficient quantities, or even well-tempered clay or flat stones.

I speak understandingly on this subject, for I have made myself acquainted with it both theoretically and practically.

With a little more wit we might use these materials so as to become richer than the richest now are, and make our civilization a blessing. The civilized man is a more experienced and wiser savage. But to make haste to my own experiment. Near the end of March, , I borrowed an axe and went down to the woods by Walden Pond, nearest to where I intended to build my house, and began to cut down some tall, arrowy white pines, still in their youth, for timber.

It is difficult to begin without borrowing, but perhaps it is the most generous course thus to permit your fellow-men to have an interest in your enterprise. The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it. It was a pleasant hillside where I worked, covered with pine woods, through which I looked out on the pond, and a small open field in the woods where pines and hickories were springing up.

The ice in the pond was not yet dissolved, though there were some open spaces, and it was all dark colored and saturated with water. There were some slight flurries of snow during the days that I worked there; but for the most part when I came out on to the railroad, on my way home, its yellow sand heap stretched away gleaming in the hazy atmosphere, and the rails shone in the spring sun, and I heard the lark and pewee and other birds already come to commence another year with us.

One day, when my axe had come off and I had cut a green hickory for a wedge, driving it with a stone, and had placed the whole to soak in a pond hole in order to swell the wood, I saw a striped snake run into the water, and he lay on the bottom, apparently without inconvenience, as long as I stayed there, or more than a quarter of an hour; perhaps because he had not yet fairly come out of the torpid state.

It appeared to me that for a like reason men remain in their present low and primitive condition; but if they should feel the influence of the spring of springs arousing them, they would of necessity rise to a higher and more ethereal life. I had previously seen the snakes in frosty mornings in my path with portions of their bodies still numb and inflexible, waiting for the sun to thaw them. On the 1st of April it rained and melted the ice, and in the early part of the day, which was very foggy, I heard a stray goose groping about over the pond and cackling as if lost, or like the spirit of the fog.

So I went on for some days cutting and hewing timber, and also studs and rafters, all with my narrow axe, not having many communicable or scholar-like thoughts, singing to myself,—. Men say they know many things; But lo! I hewed the main timbers six inches square, most of the studs on two sides only, and the rafters and floor timbers on one side, leaving the rest of the bark on, so that they were just as straight and much stronger than sawed ones.

Each stick was carefully mortised or tenoned by its stump, for I had borrowed other tools by this time. My days in the woods were not very long ones; yet I usually carried my dinner of bread and butter, and read the newspaper in which it was wrapped, at noon, sitting amid the green pine boughs which I had cut off, and to my bread was imparted some of their fragrance, for my hands were covered with a thick coat of pitch. Before I had done I was more the friend than the foe of the pine tree, though I had cut down some of them, having become better acquainted with it.

Sometimes a rambler in the wood was attracted by the sound of my axe, and we chatted pleasantly over the chips which I had made. By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising. I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards. When I called to see it he was not at home.

I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high. It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap. The roof was the soundest part, though a good deal warped and made brittle by the sun. Door-sill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board. The hens were driven in by my approach. It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal.

She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep. There was a stove, a bed, and a place to sit, an infant in the house where it was born, a silk parasol, gilt-framed looking-glass, and a patent new coffee mill nailed to an oak sapling, all told.

The bargain was soon concluded, for James had in the meanwhile returned. I to pay four dollars and twenty-five cents to-night, he to vacate at five to-morrow morning, selling to nobody else meanwhile: I to take possession at six.

It were well, he said, to be there early, and anticipate certain indistinct but wholly unjust claims on the score of ground rent and fuel. This he assured me was the only encumbrance. At six I passed him and his family on the road. One large bundle held their all,—bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens,—all but the cat, she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.

I took down this dwelling the same morning, drawing the nails, and removed it to the pond side by small cartloads, spreading the boards on the grass there to bleach and warp back again in the sun. One early thrush gave me a note or two as I drove along the woodland path. I was informed treacherously by a young Patrick that neighbor Seeley, an Irishman, in the intervals of the carting, transferred the still tolerable, straight, and drivable nails, staples, and spikes to his pocket, and then stood when I came back to pass the time of day, and look freshly up, unconcerned, with spring thoughts, at the devastation; there being a dearth of work, as he said.

He was there to represent spectatordom, and help make this seemingly insignificant event one with the removal of the gods of Troy. I dug my cellar in the side of a hill sloping to the south, where a woodchuck had formerly dug his burrow, down through sumach and blackberry roots, and the lowest stain of vegetation, six feet square by seven deep, to a fine sand where potatoes would not freeze in any winter.

The sides were left shelving, and not stoned; but the sun having never shone on them, the sand still keeps its place. I took particular pleasure in this breaking of ground, for in almost all latitudes men dig into the earth for an equable temperature. Under the most splendid house in the city is still to be found the cellar where they store their roots as of old, and long after the superstructure has disappeared posterity remark its dent in the earth.

The house is still but a sort of porch at the entrance of a burrow. At length, in the beginning of May, with the help of some of my acquaintances, rather to improve so good an occasion for neighborliness than from any necessity, I set up the frame of my house.

No man was ever more honored in the character of his raisers than I. They are destined, I trust, to assist at the raising of loftier structures one day. I began to occupy my house on the 4th of July, as soon as it was boarded and roofed, for the boards were carefully feather-edged and lapped, so that it was perfectly impervious to rain; but before boarding I laid the foundation of a chimney at one end, bringing two cartloads of stones up the hill from the pond in my arms.

I built the chimney after my hoeing in the fall, before a fire became necessary for warmth, doing my cooking in the mean while out of doors on the ground, early in the morning: which mode I still think is in some respects more convenient and agreeable than the usual one.

When it stormed before my bread was baked, I fixed a few boards over the fire, and sat under them to watch my loaf, and passed some pleasant hours in that way. In those days, when my hands were much employed, I read but little, but the least scraps of paper which lay on the ground, my holder, or tablecloth, afforded me as much entertainment, in fact answered the same purpose as the Iliad. It would be worth the while to build still more deliberately than I did, considering, for instance, what foundation a door, a window, a cellar, a garret, have in the nature of man, and perchance never raising any superstructure until we found a better reason for it than our temporal necessities even.

Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged? But alas! Shall we forever resign the pleasure of construction to the carpenter? What does architecture amount to in the experience of the mass of men? I never in all my walks came across a man engaged in so simple and natural an occupation as building his house.

We belong to the community. It is not the tailor alone who is the ninth part of a man; it is as much the preacher, and the merchant, and the farmer. Where is this division of labor to end? No doubt another may also think for me; but it is not therefore desirable that he should do so to the exclusion of my thinking for myself. True, there are architects so called in this country, and I have heard of one at least possessed with the idea of making architectural ornaments have a core of truth, a necessity, and hence a beauty, as if it were a revelation to him.

All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism. A sentimental reformer in architecture, he began at the cornice, not at the foundation. It was only how to put a core of truth within the ornaments, that every sugar plum in fact might have an almond or caraway seed in it,—though I hold that almonds are most wholesome without the sugar,—and not how the inhabitant, the indweller, might build truly within and without, and let the ornaments take care of themselves.

But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.

The enemy will find it out. He may turn pale when the trial comes. This man seemed to me to lean over the cornice, and timidly whisper his half truth to the rude occupants who really knew it better than he. What of architectural beauty I now see, I know has gradually grown from within outward, out of the necessities and character of the indweller, who is the only builder,—out of some unconscious truthfulness, and nobleness, without ever a thought for the appearance and whatever additional beauty of this kind is destined to be produced will be preceded by a like unconscious beauty of life.

A great proportion of architectural ornaments are literally hollow, and a September gale would strip them off, like borrowed plumes, without injury to the substantials. They can do without architecture who have no olives nor wines in the cellar. What if an equal ado were made about the ornaments of style in literature, and the architects of our bibles spent as much time about their cornices as the architects of our churches do? So are made the belles-lettres and the beaux-arts and their professors.

Much it concerns a man, forsooth, how a few sticks are slanted over him or under him, and what colors are daubed upon his box. Is he thinking of his last and narrow house? Toss up a copper for it as well. What an abundance of leisure he must have! Why do you take up a handful of dirt? Better paint your house your own complexion; let it turn pale or blush for you. An enterprise to improve the style of cottage architecture!

When you have got my ornaments ready I will wear them. Before winter I built a chimney, and shingled the sides of my house, which were already impervious to rain, with imperfect and sappy shingles made of the first slice of the log, whose edges I was obliged to straighten with a plane. I have thus a tight shingled and plastered house, ten feet wide by fifteen long, and eight-feet posts, with a garret and a closet, a large window on each side, two trap doors, one door at the end, and a brick fireplace opposite.

The exact cost of my house, paying the usual price for such materials as I used, but not counting the work, all of which was done by myself, was as follows; and I give the details because very few are able to tell exactly what their houses cost, and fewer still, if any, the separate cost of the various materials which compose them:—.

I have also a small wood-shed adjoining, made chiefly of the stuff which was left after building the house. I intend to build me a house which will surpass any on the main street in Concord in grandeur and luxury, as soon as it pleases me as much and will cost me no more than my present one. I thus found that the student who wishes for a shelter can obtain one for a lifetime at an expense not greater than the rent which he now pays annually.

If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement. I will endeavor to speak a good word for the truth. I cannot but think that if we had more true wisdom in these respects, not only less education would be needed, because, forsooth, more would already have been acquired, but the pecuniary expense of getting an education would in a great measure vanish.

Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides. Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants. Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.

The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents, and then following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme, a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection,—to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay.

I think that it would be better than this , for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves. The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful.

How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living? Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics. If I wished a boy to know something about the arts and sciences, for instance, I would not pursue the common course, which is merely to send him into the neighborhood of some professor, where any thing is professed and practised but the art of life;—to survey the world through a telescope or a microscope, and never with his natural eye; to study chemistry, and not learn how his bread is made, or mechanics, and not learn how it is earned; to discover new satellites to Neptune, and not detect the motes in his eyes, or to what vagabond he is a satellite himself; or to be devoured by the monsters that swarm all around him, while contemplating the monsters in a drop of vinegar.

Which would be most likely to cut his fingers? To my astonishment I was informed on leaving college that I had studied navigation!

Even the poor student studies and is taught only political economy, while that economy of living which is synonymous with philosophy is not even sincerely professed in our colleges. The consequence is, that while he is reading Adam Smith, Ricardo, and Say, he runs his father in debt irretrievably.

The devil goes on exacting compound interest to the last for his early share and numerous succeeding investments in them. Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York. We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate.

Either is in such a predicament as the man who was earnest to be introduced to a distinguished deaf woman, but when he was presented, and one end of her ear trumpet was put into his hand, had nothing to say.

As if the main object were to talk fast and not to talk sensibly. We are eager to tunnel under the Atlantic and bring the old world some weeks nearer to the new; but perchance the first news that will leak through into the broad, flapping American ear will be that the Princess Adelaide has the whooping cough.

After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey. I doubt if Flying Childers ever carried a peck of corn to mill.

I have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot. I say to my friend, Suppose we try who will get there first. The distance is thirty miles; the fare ninety cents. I remember when wages were sixty cents a day for laborers on this very road. Well, I start now on foot, and get there before night; I have travelled at that rate by the week together. You will in the mean while have earned your fare, and arrive there some time to-morrow, or possibly this evening, if you are lucky enough to get a job in season.

Instead of going to Fitchburg, you will be working here the greater part of the day. And so, if the railroad reached round the world, I think that I should keep ahead of you; and as for seeing the country and getting experience of that kind, I should have to cut your acquaintance altogether.

Such is the universal law, which no man can ever outwit, and with regard to the railroad even we may say it is as broad as it is long. To make a railroad round the world available to all mankind is equivalent to grading the whole surface of the planet.

He should have gone up garret at once. Before I finished my house, wishing to earn ten or twelve dollars by some honest and agreeable method, in order to meet my unusual expenses, I planted about two acres and a half of light and sandy soil near it chiefly with beans, but also a small part with potatoes, corn, peas, and turnips.

The whole lot contains eleven acres, mostly growing up to pines and hickories, and was sold the preceding season for eight dollars and eight cents an acre. I got out several cords of stumps in ploughing, which supplied me with fuel for a long time, and left small circles of virgin mould, easily distinguishable through the summer by the greater luxuriance of the beans there. The dead and for the most part unmerchantable wood behind my house, and the driftwood from the pond, have supplied the remainder of my fuel.

I was obliged to hire a team and a man for the ploughing, though I held the plough myself. The seed corn was given me. This never costs anything to speak of, unless you plant more than enough. I got twelve bushels of beans, and eighteen bushels of potatoes, beside some peas and sweet corn. The yellow corn and turnips were too late to come to any thing.

My whole income from the farm was. The next year I did better still, for I spaded up all the land which I required, about a third of an acre, and I learned from the experience of both years, not being in the least awed by many celebrated works on husbandry, Arthur Young among the rest, that if one would live simply and eat only the crop which he raised, and raise no more than he ate, and not exchange it for an insufficient quantity of more luxurious and expensive things, he would need to cultivate only a few rods of ground, and that it would be cheaper to spade up that than to use oxen to plough it, and to select a fresh spot from time to time than to manure the old, and he could do all his necessary farm work as it were with his left hand at odd hours in the summer; and thus he would not be tied to an ox, or horse, or cow, or pig, as at present.

I desire to speak impartially on this point, and as one not interested in the success or failure of the present economical and social arrangements. I was more independent than any farmer in Concord, for I was not anchored to a house or farm, but could follow the bent of my genius, which is a very crooked one, every moment.

Beside being better off than they already, if my house had been burned or my crops had failed, I should have been nearly as well off as before. I am wont to think that men are not so much the keepers of herds as herds are the keepers of men, the former are so much the freer.

Men and oxen exchange work; but if we consider necessary work only, the oxen will be seen to have greatly the advantage, their farm is so much the larger. Certainly no nation that lived simply in all respects, that is, no nation of philosophers, would commit so great a blunder as to use the labor of animals. True, there never was and is not likely soon to be a nation of philosophers, nor am I certain it is desirable that there should be.

Granted that some public works would not have been constructed without this aid, and let man share the glory of such with the ox and horse; does it follow that he could not have accomplished works yet more worthy of himself in that case?

When men begin to do, not merely unnecessary or artistic, but luxurious and idle work, with their assistance, it is inevitable that a few do all the exchange work with the oxen, or, in other words, become the slaves of the strongest.

Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him. Though we have many substantial houses of brick or stone, the prosperity of the farmer is still measured by the degree to which the barn overshadows the house.

This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindhand in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county. It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves? How much more admirable the Bhagvat-Geeta than all the ruins of the East! Towers and temples are the luxury of princes.

A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince. Genius is not a retainer to any emperor, nor is its material silver, or gold, or marble, except to a trifling extent. To what end, pray, is so much stone hammered?

In Arcadia, when I was there, I did not see any hammering stone. Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to perpetuate the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave.

What if equal pains were taken to smooth and polish their manners? One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon. I love better to see stones in place. The grandeur of Thebes was a vulgar grandeur. The religion and civilization which are barbaric and heathenish build splendid temples; but what you might call Christianity does not. Most of the stone a nation hammers goes toward its tomb only. It buries itself alive.

As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs.

I might possibly invent some excuse for them and him, but I have no time for it. As for the religion and love of art of the builders, it is much the same all the world over, whether the building be an Egyptian temple or the United States Bank.

It costs more than it comes to. The mainspring is vanity, assisted by the love of garlic and bread and butter. When the thirty centuries begin to look down on it, mankind begin to look up at it. As for your high towers and monuments, there was a crazy fellow once in this town who undertook to dig through to China, and he got so far that, as he said, he heard the Chinese pots and kettles rattle; but I think that I shall not go out of my way to admire the hole which he made. Many are concerned about the monuments of the West and the East,—to know who built them.

For my part, I should like to know who in those days did not build them,—who were above such trifling. But to proceed with my statistics. The expense of food for eight months, namely, from July 4th to March 1st, the time when these estimates were made, though I lived there more than two years,—not counting potatoes, a little green corn, and some peas, which I had raised, nor considering the value of what was on hand at the last date, was. Clothing and some incidental expenses within the same dates, though little can be inferred from this item, amounted to.

So that all the pecuniary outgoes, excepting for washing and mending, which for the most part were done out of the house, and their bills have not yet been received,—and these are all and more than all the ways by which money necessarily goes out in this part of the world,—were. I address myself now to those of my readers who have a living to get.

And to meet this I have for farm produce sold. These statistics, however accidental and therefore uninstructive they may appear, as they have a certain completeness, have a certain value also. Nothing was given me of which I have not rendered some account. It appears from the above estimate, that my food alone cost me in money about twenty-seven cents a week. It was, for nearly two years after this, rye and Indian meal without yeast, potatoes, rice, a very little salt pork, molasses, and salt, and my drink water.

It was fit that I should live on rice, mainly, who loved so well the philosophy of India. To meet the objections of some inveterate cavillers, I may as well state, that if I dined out occasionally, as I always had done, and I trust shall have opportunities to do again, it was frequently to the detriment of my domestic arrangements.

But the dining out, being, as I have stated, a constant element, does not in the least affect a comparative statement like this. I have made a satisfactory dinner, satisfactory on several accounts, simply off a dish of purslane Portulaca oleracea which I gathered in my cornfield, boiled and salted. I give the Latin on account of the savoriness of the trivial name. And pray what more can a reasonable man desire, in peaceful times, in ordinary noons, than a sufficient number of ears of green sweet-corn boiled, with the addition of salt?

Even the little variety which I used was a yielding to the demands of appetite, and not of health. Yet men have come to such a pass that they frequently starve, not for want of necessaries, but for want of luxuries; and I know a good woman who thinks that her son lost his life because he took to drinking water only.

The reader will perceive that I am treating the subject rather from an economic than a dietetic point of view, and he will not venture to put my abstemiousness to the test unless he has a well-stocked larder.

Bread I at first made of pure Indian meal and salt, genuine hoe-cakes, which I baked before my fire out of doors on a shingle or the end of a stick of timber sawed off in building my house; but it was wont to get smoked and to have a piny flavor. I tried flour also; but have at last found a mixture of rye and Indian meal most convenient and agreeable.

In cold weather it was no little amusement to bake several small loaves of this in succession, tending and turning them as carefully as an Egyptian his hatching eggs. They were a real cereal fruit which I ripened, and they had to my senses a fragrance like that of other noble fruits, which I kept in as long as possible by wrapping them in cloths. Leaven, which some deem the soul of bread, the spiritus which fills its cellular tissue, which is religiously preserved like the vestal fire,—some precious bottle-full, I suppose, first brought over in the Mayflower, did the business for America, and its influence is still rising, swelling, spreading, in cerealian billows over the land,—this seed I regularly and faithfully procured from the village, till at length one morning I forgot the rules, and scalded my yeast; by which accident I discovered that even this was not indispensable,—for my discoveries were not by the synthetic but analytic process,—and I have gladly omitted it since, though most housewives earnestly assured me that safe and wholesome bread without yeast might not be, and elderly people prophesied a speedy decay of the vital forces.

Yet I find it not to be an essential ingredient, and after going without it for a year am still in the land of the living; and I am glad to escape the trivialness of carrying a bottle-full in my pocket, which would sometimes pop and discharge its contents to my discomfiture. It is simpler and more respectable to omit it.

Man is an animal who more than any other can adapt himself to all climates and circumstances. Neither did I put any sal soda, or other acid or alkali, into my bread. It would seem that I made it according to the recipe which Marcus Porcius Cato gave about two centuries before Christ.

Manus mortariumque bene lavato. Ubi bene subegeris, defingito, coquitoque sub testu. Wash your hands and trough well. Put the meal into the trough, add water gradually, and knead it thoroughly. Not a word about leaven. But I did not always use this staff of life. At one time, owing to the emptiness of my purse, I saw none of it for more than a month. Every New Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them.

Yet so far are we from simplicity and independence that, in Concord, fresh and sweet meal is rarely sold in the shops, and hominy and corn in a still coarser form are hardly used by any. For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store. I saw that I could easily raise my bushel or two of rye and Indian corn, for the former will grow on the poorest land, and the latter does not require the best, and grind them in a hand-mill, and so do without rice and pork; and if I must have some concentrated sweet, I found by experiment that I could make a very good molasses either of pumpkins or beets, and I knew that I needed only to set out a few maples to obtain it more easily still, and while these were growing I could use various substitutes beside those which I have named.

Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water. What would become known as the Suffolk Resolves was first discussed at this meeting. Samuel Dunbar a Harvard educated parish minister. His Eulogy was read by Paul Revere.

So the two questions are. A Binion and S. Malevsky Published by Thomas Y. New York. The book is Blue Cloth hardback with green, purple and gold on the front. Is has two sets of copyright dates on the inside, , by Henry Altemus, and , by Thomas Y. If you could provide me with any information I would forever be in your debt. Thank you for extending the courtesy of your wisdom. Sincerely, Deborah R. Deborah, the first was published in London in All copyright dates are the same. You may email a photo of the title page to me and I can tell you whether it is truly from or not.

I have a lovely book I cannot find reference to anywhere. What makes it unusual is the cover. It is tightly bound in brown suede and has two multicolored leaves that look and feel handpainted onto the sued. It belonged to my great grandfather, who was born in s. Walsh, Ellwood Harvey and John Elderken.

Ashmead, Printer. Copy write is and has over engravings within the book. The cover is emerald green cloth with gold and black embellished pictures on the front and binding. As far as I can tell all the pages are there but the binding is loose and worn on the top and bottom. This is a hard copy and has no dust cover. Any help you could give me will be most appreciated.

The information on your site was very helpful. Thank you, Diane. Diane, Thank you for your comment. I must not be looking in the right place. It is leather bound and well used. Can you help me by pointing me towards a website or person who can give me an idea as to the value of this book? I found a book that has been in our fanily for several generations and would like to know what the value may be.

Many are first editions and a vareity of subjects. There are also leather bound and other very interesting features. I am not a book expert, but was wondering where I could go to get a good appraisal of my books. Thank you for your help. The best course of action is to pick out a few that you think might be first editions and do a little homework, or, if this is not feasible, send along the basic book information author, title, imprint city, printer, date either as a typed document or as photographs of title pages.

I have a copy of The Seawolf, signed by Jack London. In extremely good condition. No published date, only last copyright date of The first edition of the Sea Wolf came out in , and is collectible. This later edition would not be appropriate for a rare book auction.

I thank you for your insight to on what to look for in old books. I was wondering if you could direct me further on value. Oddly, there is inscriptions by Lolo D. Gillispie dated and another by Donna J. Barrell dated Barrell was her daughter. The book is red cloth like. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks for your comment. Best — Devon. I have a book in excelant condition titled Leaders of the 19th century. Copyright Would it have any value? I have a first edition of The phantom of the opera published by bobbs and Merrill , Trying to get a value of the book.

Appleton and Company. The book is in good condition, can you please give by the value of what this book might be. Thank You. I would be interested to hear what, if anything, you have learned about it since you posted almost a year ago. Regards, Erynne. Queensland, Australia. Hi Erynne. Thank you! Charles M.

Sheldon, D. A or N Aforniohan W. No jacket but good shape. Any ideas?? I have a leather bound set of The Marvelous Miniature Library. All are stamped Made in France.

Published by Miniature Dictionary Publishers, Inc. Minkus, New York. No dates. Do you know when these may be been published?

Would you have an approximate value of this collection? It would be below our minimum for auction. No slip covers. They are in excellent condition some slight yellowing on the hard cover but no tears inside or out. No writting and no dogears. Can you give me an idea of their value. Volumes They have the paper covers but there is nothing written on the covers just a cut out so the volume number conveniently shows through the hole.

They are in excellent condition. No torn pages, writting nor dogears. Thanks for your comments. They are not something we would handle at auction. They are in good condition no paper covers and have been in a box in a closet for the last 50 years. Are they of interest in the antique book market? Thank you for your response. I have a good condition Les Miserables two volume set.

Hapgood translator They have gold covered top edges and have many page bottoms joined. No markings except for a large gift inscription on inside cover and facing page blank. Possibly never read. Slightly marred title on the spine of Vol II. The absence of a book jacket that never existed does not affect the value of the book, so for books printed before book jackets were invented… this is a question that cannot be answered briefly.

I have a edition of Hiawatha that appears to be covered with alligator skin. It is in very good condition. What would the value be? Pamela, Thanks for commenting. Thanks for the great info. I believe this is the first American printing. The book is is in good condition with some wear at the top and bottom of the spine.

Is this book of value on the antique book market? Dennis, Thank you for your comment. We are clearing out my mothers house. We found an Websters Dictionary in good condition. Is this something we should sell at an estate sale or privately if it is valuable? We cannot find a way to approximate the value. Please advise. I found a book at a used book store that I have been wondering about. Widdleton, Publisher. The binding is battered and the pages are yellowed with age, but otherwise it is in good shape with a lovely marbled cover.

Do you think that is a fair price? Please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website to find out what your autograph book may be worth at auction: secure. Very informative website. I have also come into a large collection of mostly older books. Thank you again for the information posted. Most of the books I suspect date between s to s. Are there any other tools out there that you could suggest that may help me separate the low-end books from the potential high end?

Thank you again. Best of luck with the collection. I purchased a box of books at an auction and would like to know the value of one in particular. Brown Girl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall. Random House. First Printing. Hi, My mom was given this book to her by a friend many years ago and she has had it tucked away.

She gave it to me as she is getting up in age and I was wondering if it is worth anything. Clemens above when my copy was printed and I would guess that would have been the 1st edtion. I have a book titled on outside Don Juan, it is intricately tooled leather, with two colors, black and brown. Smith It was given to my great uncle by a friend in as is inscribed.

Any information you could give me is appreciated, thank you for your time. I have a book by T. Published by A. Worthington in It has a preface by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It has a green cover with gold decoration. It has illustrations inside with tissue protective covering over each one. Any value? Gibbins titled Industry in England in very good condition. Curious if anyone knows if any value as the book is really in incredible condition for its age aside from some penciled in notes from an obvious past student.

Steve, Thanks for your comment. This book is not something we would handle at auction. Hardcover binding is worn on the edges and edges are starting to come apart. Any value , any interest? Merle, Thank you for your comment. I recently obtained 4 books and would like to obtain their values: 1.

I have a 1st edition, 1st printing of grapes of wrath and a 1st edition, 1st printing of Sweet Thursday that is signed and inscribed. Please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website in order to find out what your books may be worth at auction: secure.

Thank you very much for the informative article and thanking you in advance for any advice you may offer. New York D. Binding is intact. Has gilt gold brer rabbit on brown cover. Ripped blank page but still present. Also…I found The Deerslayer.

Fenimore Cooper. I only find a reference to this publishing in a Pittsburg Gazette ad in The condition of the paper seems quite old. Thank you, Adrian Stocks. To find out what these two books may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure.

It is an A4 size book. I am wondering what this may be valued at? I have several books that I would appreciate your professional opinion on: 1.

Lippincott Company, First Edition 2. I have the two volume set of Dr. I want to donate them to a local auction and was wondering what the value range might be. I have two books I am interesting in getting a value for. A few websites have ranged from dollars, and have left me a little in the dark of what to expect. It is in surprisingly good condition, with no tears or cracks, and only slight to moderate wear on the covers and binding.

This edition is black, with the illustrated whale head breaching out of water on the cover, and the whale tail along the binding. Neither book has a jacket, but I believe neither originally came with one. Neither has any writing in the book, or any tears or cracks. Thank you for your time! I recently came upon a first edition American imprint of Wharton, J. The Law Lexicon, or Dictionary of Jurisprudence.

Not the Rothman reprint. Published: Harrisburg, Pa. Fisher Sydney George Fisher? The front cover is loose. Inside pages are tight with light foxing. To find out what your book may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. It is leather bound, with five raised edges on the spine, gold gilt edges, and quite a bit of embossing on the covers.

Also, there are numerous engravings in the book, some with tissue between the pages. Any insight as to value that you could provide would be greatly appreciated. In tolerable condition, but needs some work. It was evidently supposed to be noteworthy due to its being Illustrated with engravings by by John Leach.

Any insight to its value would be appreciated. I have a Pres. John F. Kennedy colorful White House book with personal message to my mother written on the cover and signed by J. My uncle Jerry Bruno was J. I also have the book Jerry Bruno wrote about Kennedy. I would like to know the value. Thank you, Rosemary Kishline.

What is the current value of this book. Please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website to find out what your Darwin book may be worth at auction: secure. I have a copy of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Red cloth cover. No jacket. Book is ion good condition. From a school library. Bonzoi stamp on back. Thank you for a very informative site! To find out what your copy of Alice in Wonderland may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure.

I have a copy of The Patent Hat. This copy is or seems to be particularly old. How can I find information and value of this book. I hope you can help me. Brian, To find out what your book may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure.

I have a set of 11 books, Charles Dickens,appear to have been first issued in , but the preface is dated Are in good condition, but have a library stamp on the inside blank leaf. Also a soft green leather edition with gold edging on pages of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte,second edition December 21st, with a note to the 3rd edition dated April 13th Has a handwritten name, dated Also a library stamp.

Is there any value to any of these books? New York: Nafis and Cornish. Published in Philadelphia by Mentz and Roboudt. Not sure if I have spelled everything right, the typeface is difficult to read.

The cover had a lock which has deteriorated. Somehow my comment was deleted during a wait on reply. I hope you can tell me about an old book my Dad just acquired. Dear Christine, This book is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. You may be able to find out more about your book on a used book website: abebooks , alibris , biblio , addall. Great information.

I have looked on a few websites for pricing on two old books but without any luck. Paper page edges are gold color gilded. Any assistenace would be appreciated. Banks in Scott C. Bone, who will find full particulars of himself in the dedication of this book! Thanks for the comment. I have beee trying to find information online about the pubplication date or possible worth of a book but I am unable to find any on the particular edition that I have. It is a Blue cloth covered with numbered pages.

Do you have any information about this book? This book is signed. Also has several samples of binding that can be obtained. Other illustrations have a small page insert describing the illustration.. I have never been able to find any info on this second book. Any help will be most appreciated. Cari Bubbico says: Your comment is awaiting moderation. December 11, at am Dear Ms. It was published in My copy is intact, no tears, and the only flaw is that the corner edges of the cover is slightly worn.

I have no true idea of its worth nor do I know where it is best to sell it. I would appreciate your expert opinion. Hi my question is, I have the book, The Side of Paradise Fitzgerald, is without the dust cover but is on.. I am curious to know if this is a valuable book-all I can find on the Internet is about reprints in and so I am assuming this must be a worthwhile book to be still reprinting it.

It is in pretty good condition apart from the back covering of the spine. Thanks for any info on the book! Hi John, Thanks for the comment. Happy holidays. I have a few books that I am trying to find info on.

I do not see a date in 2 of them along with no copy right date. All have tissue paper over the illustrations. They appear to be leather bound. But it could be some faux material. They all have the same designs on the spine. They are burgondy in color. Thank You for your time. Gary, Please fill out an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. Happy holidays! I think the book is from the late , so before WW II.

Published in Germany and survived the huge bookburning sessions of the Nazis. Do you have any idea of what it would be worth? Tom, To find out what this book may be worth at auction, please submit photos of the title page and copyright page using the auction evaluation form on our website: secure. I have book in a Czechoslovakian dialect with a printed date of yes ! A person with a rudimentary knowledge of the language told me it is a biblical book. Unfortunately, I rescued the book from an incinerator so the top of the book is singed in one spot going down into the cover and title page about one inch.

The cover is in very poor shape and the spine is virtually unreadable. The pages are quite remarkable in their clarity. How do I determine if this book has any value?

Thank you for your time and consideration. Jerry, Thanks for your comment. To find out what your book may be worth at auction, please send a photo of the title page and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. Thank you for your article! Stokes, great condition, blue cloth lining — no illustration or design embossed on the cover — simply the title.

Presumably a christmas present from May to an unidentified recipient. Please submit photos of the book and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. I have stumbled across your webset by luck perhaps? I have a book published in July of if my reading of Roman numerals has not failed me from the Roycroft Shop, East Astoria.

I have been tried to find a value on the book before my father died but it appears the prices are scattered all over the place. The edition I own has a green suede cover, a hand-drawn portrait inside covered with vellum, the thick paper is not evenly cut to me-as an artist-it almost appears as handmade paper. Where would I find a more accurate price on this book? To find out what the value may be at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure.

Hi, just6 wondering if there is a reply to my questions of Nov. I have inherited a large collection of old books. I have found one that came with a dust cover that is not paper but a flower printed cardboard. Signed by him as a Christmas gift Published by Dorrance and Company Philidelphia.

It came with a post card to order new books, a bulletin with his picture announcing his new books and a reprint of an article from The Sunday Vindicator, May 8, with a detailed story of the author.

The book is in excellent condition. To find out what your books may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. It is a hard back in fairly good shape, has all the pages and a library stamp on the first blank pages. I have been quoted various prices from various people, few of whom i actually feel have any clue about what they are talking about.

Is it an actual first edition? Any info or recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I have an Grams unraveled Atlas of the world. To find out what your atlas may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. I paid bucks for it! To find out what your copy of Morals and Dogma may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure.

Green cloth boards, no dust jacket. Book is in overall good condition. To find out what your Burroughs book may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. Can you help me with where to look to see if the book is worth something? Library of Congress catalog Card Number Addition to no. S for the Southern District of New York.

There is a photo of Hampton Court covered by tissue paper in the front of the book. Can you please tell me if this is worth anything. These books are not something we would handle at auction. Hello, My mother has a full set of Funk and Wagnalls Encyclopedias from the s in perfect condition. They seem to be leather bound or some sort of very durable binding and have gold leaf on them. I also have 5 boxes of vintage books that my senior in-laws want me to sell.

Also, do Christian Bibles ever accumulate much value? Bibles need to be very special to be valuable. Also, collectors are interested in first editions of different Bible translations, and other landmarks in Bible scholarship.

Caldwell Co. It was published by the John W. It does not give a year when they where published. These books appear to be quite old. I was wondering if you can determine what year they where published and the value of them. Thankyou for your time. I have a copy of Narratives and Adventures of Travellers in Africa. The book is in poor shape, with fading on the cover,spine and back, and the binding inside has separated.

I could not find a date anywhere, though the cover says Alta Edition. What does make this book interesting is that it was bound backward. Does this make a book any more valuable? Philip gives the book Martin Luther year, luther on its last page make notes about it in Latin. Apparently the book was in the City Library in Subotica — Serbia at that time Kingdom of yogoslavia until when Subotica was occupied by Hungarians.

After that this and number of other valuable books has gone missing! Any information about this book will be greatly appreciated. Also do you know how would one go about searching for such book? Thanks to Google Books I have complete pdf file of the Austrian book. I have a red letter new testament bible Lic. Lay of the bell. This is what is engraved on the front cover.

It is published by Charles Schribner, copyright What are your thoughts? Can you tell be approximate value range of and or direct me perhaps to a Biblical specialty site for:. Edited and prefaced by R. New York: John Wurtele Lovell. This is from the private library of E. Randall of Baker University signed and dated November 24, Please tell me a value.

This Charles Lamb book is not something we would handle at auction. The cover is not in great shape, and the binding is very loose. While there are a few pages that are soiled by time, the illustrations show very little signs of fading and are in overall great shape. The book was a gift from the first dean of the Duke Law School, and has an inscription from him not sure if this hurts the value or not.

I have an antique book Love-songs of childhood by eugene field copyright and one hundred narrative poems by scott, foresome and company copyright and some other antique books in very good condition im curious of the worth.

All pages intact with no tears. Any thoughts? Any ideas on it? Collier Pub. All Blue with gold print Sinclair Lewis imprint on front with sig. Hi Phyllis, To find out what your Sinclair Lewis and Robert Louis Stevenson books may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. I have a copy of Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert…dated by Bibliotheque-charpentier printed in french.

Book is bound in brown leather and marbled colored front and back. Is this a book of any value? Valerie — Thanks for the comment. The publishing date is sept. I have not been able to find a copy for sale anywhere. Is this book worth anything? I am not a book collector but I enjoy antiques. I currently have a book that I believe is an original print as in printed in the year indicated from titled Tasker Jevons; The Real Story. I currently have this book for sale on eBay.

Good luck with the sale. Front and back cover OK. The spine is in bad shape. Chris, To find out what your book may be worth at auction, please submit photos and an auction evaluation form on our website: secure. I have a agamemnon of aedchylus translated by robert browning, with half of the pages uncut at the top. Lovell and Company. The pages are yellow how much is this worth? This Charles Dickens book is not something we would handle at auction.

It is in excellent like new condition with a dust cover. It has never been checked out. Ville Du Havre November 23, from Mrs. Adams of Augusta, Georgia. Written at Sea November 28, I have been trying to look up a book now for a long time. I can not find it any where. I would like to find the value to know how safe of an area I should keep it in. Thank you for your help! Heath Robinson. The person I got it from received it in Is there any value to this book.

This Hans Christian Andersen book is not something we would handle at auction. Temple Univ. Robey Is it worth anything? Marge, This real estate book is not something we would handle at auction. The value of this H. I have 6 paperback books from the Riverside Literature series. Dates range from Do these books have any value?

Thank you so much for your help. This Riverside Literature series is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. Very informative article. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and expertise. My sister has three books she would like some information on please. She said it was published by the Worthington Company. She says it is in fair condition. Thompson, fair condition, published date by Lovell and Corele Group? I believe he served in in Chile. The copyright has first then It was first published by Phillips Mulbrey?

It is in worn condition. I have a not great condition book some of the binding at the bottom is torn off and pages very yellowed Arlington Edition of David Copperfield. Cover is hard and intact but a 1 cm gash and edges worn. Published New York; Hurst and Co. Inside Back cover has an ad for Sohmer and Co.

Hi Kelly, This David Copperfield book is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. I have a few old books that I am wondering if your auction would be interested in. Alcott 2. Websters Handy Dictionary illustrated. Merriam then under it says by Eloise W. Wood and Mrs. Abbie Wood Steward and under that has a W.

I see nothing of dates. It is a Bible that my grandmother had. There is no date anywhere other than handwritten is Harley Pursley born Apr 23, Hi Lisa, These old books are not of high value and are not something we would offer at auction.

I have a copy of Henry Noel Humphries, ed. One page is free from the binding but it is otherwise very good condition. Can you please give an idea of the value? Kathryn, This book is not something we would handle at auction. Most were not bought as collector items, I think. Perhaps Mssr. Lomax was a real character, or perhaps a fictitious name inscribed by an ambitious book dealer.

Nothing against any book dealers, by the way. Tonson and S. Book is in excellent shape. However, it has a fake dust jacket marked Facsimile Dust Jackets L.

Should I try to sell it with or without the fake cover? What is an estimated value either way? Green cover with gold emboss. Copyright by Houghton, Mifflin and Co. Boston and New York Riverside press Cambridge. It has been stored in a musty basement for years. Two of the volumes appear to be signed. I plan to donate these to the Poetical Society, but would like to know what their value might be?

The pages appear to be all there and I can see only one handwritten pencil note on the inside—in German.

This copy of Das Kapital is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. I have the following books : Robert Schuller 18 Volume Collectible set. The works of zane grey volume hardcover set. Also, is there a place where I can sell these books? Should I approach an auction house with the books and ask for valuation?

These sets of books are not something we would handle at auction. Signature and date of on owners page. Second story in book is Agnes Grey.

Good condition with some worn edges. Thanks Anne. Anne — This copy of Wuthering Heights is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. This book has been donated to the Newseum but have always been curious about its potential among collectors. Kennedy with a personal greeting to my uncle who was a friend of the family. This was given as a gift at the time of its publishing. Joseph — This book is not something we would handle at auction.

I have a first edition copy of Midnight Weddings by Mrs. Meeke, which I hear is very rare, published London, by T. It has the publisher stamp in the front of the book, the pages are readable, the cover is a bit old and worn.

James — This book is not something we would offer at auction. The older books are signed I followed her around book fairs in the 70s and 80s. I am interested in an evaluation of my collection for estate purposes. I am also interested in selling the duplicates I have and possibly the entire collection.

Can you help me or refer me to a source that can? All have their dust jackets which are protected with sleeves and the books have been in climate comtrolled storage for some years. I have been out of that loop for some time and have lost touch with my contacts. Thank You…Sam. Hi Sam, This collection is not something we would offer at auction. Revell Company, copyright All pages intact. Judy — This book is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction.

Kelly — This book is not of high value and is not something we would offer at auction. I have 12 books published in of Shakespeare. They are leatherbound I think, and in very good condition considering the age. Are these worth anything more than sentimental value? Hi Kim — No, these book are not of high value and are not something we would offer at auction. Publisher E. No dust jacket. Covers are a dark tan with black printing. I do plan to sell it but have no idea of value.

Thanks so much. Love your site. Thank you so much for your helpful response to my question about the book I have. Very much appreciated!! I have the bible designed to be read as living literature the old and new testaments in the king James version Arranged and edited by Ernest Sutherland Bates.

Copyright by Simon and Schuster, inc. Conley Company, Publishers, Gregory — Your bible and copy of Poems of Passion are both not of high value and are not something we would offer at auction. Wondering about: 1. These old books are not of high value and are not something we would offer at auction. Before posting a comment here, please look for your book on a used book website: abebooks , alibris , biblio , addall.

To get an idea of the types of books Skinner offers at auction, browse our past auction catalogs. New Edition and illustrated. Translated from French to English in Two Volumes in one. Translated from the french of M.

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